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Are non-fatal workplace injuries declining?

With increased awareness of worker safety and technological advancements, some fields are safer in 2020 when compared to previous years. However, there are still many hazards in the workplace and a lot of employees sustain non-fatal injuries. Although many are lucky to survive an accident, non-fatal injuries often lead to a host of consequences, such as high levels of pain, medical costs and other financial problems, immobility and other hardships.

It is crucial for workers in all fields to understand the risks they face. Moreover, reviewing statistics provides a clearer understanding of this serious issue, such as the prevalence of non-fatal work-related injuries.

Statistics on workplace injuries

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the non-fatal occupational injury and illness rate among private-sector workers was 2.8 in 2018. Fortunately, this rate has declined steadily since 2003, when the rate was 5.0. During 2007, this rate was 4.2 and it dropped to 3.4 in 2011. In 2018, fewer private-sector employees took time off work because of an injury when compared to 2003. However, the workplace remains dangerous for employees in many fields and a lot of workers continue to sustain non-fatal injuries.

Dangerous occupations and workplace injuries

Certain jobs are especially dangerous when it comes to injuries that require taking time away from work. For example, those who move stock and freight, nurses, large truck drivers, cleaners and those who work in the construction industry are especially likely to sustain a serious injury that leaves them unable to work for a period of time. Sometimes, injured workers are never able to return to their former position.